Black and white photo of man with slightly curly hair looking into camera

Peter Jerome

PMZ Trustee 

Head of Engagement Services, University of Reading.

MUSICAL NOTES

What do you do for PMZ?

I listen, I question, I offer support and advice when and where I can, if I can. My background is in arts management, music education, charity fundraising and data management and analytics.

Do you play any instruments?

Yes, I am a music graduate from the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. I play (or played) the Clarinet, Saxophone and Piano. During my studies, however, I became more interested in community music, music in therapeutic settings, music education, and arts management.

What musical instrument would best describe you as a person?

I couldn’t choose one even if my life depended on it. The collective and collaborative brilliance of a whole orchestra, on the other hand… Being part of an awe inspiring, electrifying sound world is what I am about. It is very nerdy but I love musical structures like sonata form and I love epic symphonies like Mahler 1, Sibelius 2 and 5, Walton 1 and so on. I think my favourite orchestral piece would be John Adam’s Harmonielehre. The romantic tonal expression of the early 20th century meets the rhythmic complexity of minimalism; I just love it.

What has music done for you in your life?

I can’t imagine what my life would be like without music. It is such an instrumental part of who I am. The discipline of lessons, practice, and rehearsals; the lifelong friendships through ensembles; the sense of achievement of grade exams and performances; the aspiration to study music at conservatoire; my qualifications, my career and those softer, musically honed, skills such as resilience, determination, persistence, collaboration, self-reflection and constructive criticism can be attributed to my musical pathway.

Additionally, an important and all to often overlooked essential of music plays a restorative/ regenerative role in my life. That is the silences, pauses, breaths, gasps and rests, between the sounds. Like music, we can’t be Fortissimo all the time, so you’ll often find me seeking out quieter places away from the hustle and bustle of life. Although nature can be thunderingly loud at the best of times too.

What’s the best bit about working at PMZ?

It’s early days so far having just joined as a Trustee but I was always so impressed by the way the CEO of Plymouth Music Zone, Debbie Geraghty, spoke about inclusion and leadership in the arts when I saw her speaking as part of many a national Culture Sector Network conference panel.  I have since had the pleasure of visiting PMZ on several occasions to meet the rest of the team and have always been equally struck by the sense of community and duty of care you all have towards each other. It is a rare and brilliant quality. It should be something you’re all proud of and should also be cherished. I feel excited to be able to be even a small part of that now. 

What’s the first record/CD you ever bought?

My house was full of records and CDs, mainly classical, swing and jazz. Long road trips were usually drowned out by 60s bands and breakfast tunes were the classic dad vibes of Radio 2.  So, in contrast to all this the first CD I ever bought was No Need to Argue the Cranberries second album in 1994.

      Jo Higson

      PMZ Special Advisor – Equality Advocate

      MUSICAL NOTES

      What do you do for PMZ?
      I am a Special Advisor, bringing my specialist knowledge and thirty-five years of experience of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion to help in any way I can. I have worked both at a strategic level and on the front-line supporting people directly and currently manage a community team for The Co-operative Group (The Co-op). I am a Fellow of the Institute of Equality and Diversity Professionals, but it’s not just a job for me, it is a real passion running throughout my life.

      I have long been a supporter of Plymouth Music Zone, having brought a group of talented people being supported by Devon and Cornwall Refugee Support, back in 2011. I saw the transformational effect of PMZ then and will be ever grateful for Teri, the music leader for the group, who insisted I didn’t sit on the sidelines and gave me the confidence to sing. I have previously been a Trustee at Plymouth Music Zone too – which the pandemic rather disrupted. So, it’s great to be back to be supporting their incredibly inspiring work.

      Do you play any instruments?

      I started learning the violin at age 8, having been inspired by the Halle Proms in Manchester. It was a real treat to go in to the city on the train and see some world-leading musicians from around the world. I stopped when I went to University at 18 but have been back to it a couple of times, most recently in 2017 when I had lessons again. I also have a mandolin (same string configuration) which I started to teach myself during the pandemic, and intend to continue (with some lessons) when I finish my PhD.

      I have also had times of pure joy singing in harmony in choirs. I don’t have a strong voice for solos but sang alto in my school choir and loved singing in the annual carol service. We were once recorded for BBC Radio and transmitted on Christmas Day. In more recent years I have been part of a couple of choirs including the Barbican Community Choir and Voices at TRP.

      What musical instrument would best describe you as a person?
      Mmmm. A good question. I asked this of some of my Co-op colleagues and they suggested a gamelan because it has a beautiful tone, has international influences and is a bit unusual. I thought that was very nice of them to suggest – so yes, I’ll take that.

      What has music done for you in your life?
      I couldn’t imagine living without it. I love listening, participating and seeing the joy it brings to others. Which you can obviously see in abundance at PMZ. I really enjoy live music too, both in small intimate venues (there are some amazing local musicians – Alex Hart, Becca Langsford, Kay Scoble and Swingology to name a few) and large concerts. Ludovico Einaudi is one of my favourite composers and I loved hearing him at the Pavilions, and in the summer I went to the All Points East Festival in London to hear one of my current favourites, Jungle (“Back on 74” is my current earworm). There is something about feeling the music reverberate within your body that is so life-affirming.

      What’s the best bit about working at PMZ?
      The people – and the values that everyone upholds in all the work that goes on here. Seeing my passion for equality, diversity and inclusion play(!) out here is wonderful.

      What’s the first record/CD you ever bought?
      Eek. It was a 45rpm vinyl. The Wombles and The Wombling Song. Least said about that, the better.

          Anna Détári seated on some stairs, leaning her chin on her hand

          Dr Anna Détári

          PMZ Special Adviser

          Lecturer in Performance Psychology – a member of the Centre of Performance Science, a collaboration between the Royal College of Music and the Imperial College, London

          MUSICAL NOTES

          What do you do for PMZ?
          I’m a Special Advisor, looking for opportunities to support the charity in any health and wellbeing-related matter.

          Do you play any instruments?
          I’m a classically trained flautist with a BA and an MA and I’m still an active player (while lecturing in performance psychology and musicians’ health at the Royal College of Music) so I’m spending quite a lot of time in the practice room! I also play the piano – it was my first instrument which I started when I was 5 years old. These days, I don’t play as frequently as I wish to, but I’m happy to play the 3-4 pieces I still remember at dinner parties! During lockdown, I took up the recorder to play duets with my flatmate for fun – we went through every single piece of sheet music we could find on the internet in our daily practice sessions.

          What musical instrument would best describe you as a person?
          I will have to stick with the flute – it played a central role in my life (pun intended)! Its sound can be shiny and sparkly but also gentle and soft, and it fits in a variety of genres from classical to jazz, similar to the broad variety of my interests and activities.

          What has music done for you in your life?
          Music gave me meaning. I think I was about 9 years old when I told my mother that I’d become a musician and, while it has sometimes been a rocky road, I’m still convinced that it was the smartest decision of my life.

          What’s the best bit about working at PMZ?
          I met the Chief Executive of Plymouth Music Zone, Debbie Geraghty, at a national Think Tank on Musician Wellbeing organised by Britten Pears Arts and was deeply impressed by the charity’s inclusive and musician-centred practices – this is something we all could learn from! I’m hoping that by collaborating with and advising this wonderful organisation, I can bring some awareness of the importance of community music to our students at the Royal College of Music.

          What’s the first record/CD you ever bought?
          That’s a tricky one because I was surrounded by a steadily growing number of records and CDs from a young age (my family really appreciated music and kept buying new ones) and I’m not sure which was the first one I actually got myself. My guess is Jean-Pierre Rampal’s recordings of baroque flute concertos, but it might have been a birthday gift… nevertheless, those three CDs were played so many times that after a while my family begged me to put on something else!

              Bee Jarvis

              MUSICAL NOTES

              What do you do for PMZ?

              I am a singing Music Leader for PMZ, and I am currently leading the Inclusive Voices group!

              Do you play any instruments?

              I sure do! My main instrument is the piano, but I can also play the Guitar and Ukulele. Right now I’m learning the Cello!

              What musical instrument would best describe you as a person?

              I reckon I would be hanging chimes! They sound like sparkles, and I feel like I fully embody sparkles. 

              What has music done for you in your life?

              Music has played a significant role in my life, as a source of expression, comfort, enjoyment and connection. I’ve been involved in music from a young age, starting with piano and singing, and it has been a constant presence. During school and into University I struggled to connect with many of my peers, before I knew I was Autistic, but music was always there to provide a language I understood and a way to express myself. Even when I was feeling lost and unsure of my direction in my early 20s, being part of a choir helped me stay grounded. Today, music has become my work, and it brings me so much joy!

              What’s the best bit about working at PMZ?

              The wonderful people! There’s never a bad day at PMZ, the door is always open and there’s a smile and a cuppa waiting for you. Even though I don’t drink tea, it’s still very much appreciated.

              What’s the first record/CD you ever bought?

              I reckon it was the West End Recording of Joseph and The Technicolour Dreamcoat! There was a point where I knew every single word. 

                  Liz Hill

                  Liz Hill

                  PMZ Trustee

                  Retired Infant School Head Teacher 

                  MUSICAL NOTES

                  What do you do for PMZ?

                  Hello, my name is Liz and I have enjoyed a career in teaching where I have been able to indulge my passion for music and the creative arts. Now, as a Trustee within PMZ, I bring my knowledge of education and safeguarding to support their work across the many communities they engage with.  I know how enjoyable and beneficial music is for all ages and how musical experiences can bring so much joy and confidence to every child but especially to those who have experienced trauma. I had the pleasure of working directly with Plymouth Music Zone for many years as a Head Teacher in a local Infant School in Plymouth and saw first hand the power and impact of PMZ’s approach and how much the children responded.

                  Do you play any instruments?

                  It all began when I was a child of 4 or 5 and I remember my mother playing the piano or violin whilst my brother and I sang or recited poems.  At school I learned to play the recorder and then took up playing the clarinet at the age of 11.  I really wanted to play the saxophone because it sounded so rich and sexy but the school had run out of saxophones so I had a clarinet instead!  I did love playing the clarinet and joined the school orchestra and had some lessons too.  It was only when I became an infant teacher that I realised what fun percussion instruments can be.  Since becoming a grandma I have an enthusiastic granddaughter with whom I can have fun with playing on bought and homemade instruments.

                  What musical instrument would best describe you as a person?

                  As a person I am optimistic and look for the positives and opportunities in life and am always ‘on the go’.  The instrument that best describes me is a Xylophone and if you use the pentatonic notes, anybody can play it, slowly or at speed and it always sounds great.

                  What has music done for you in your life?

                  I have an eclectic taste in music and enjoy ‘live’ music from local bands, orchestral stuff, folk and singing and playing with friends.  I think that music satisfies the soul and there is something for every occasion.  I enjoy recognising a tune or song and it evokes memories for me.

                  What’s the best bit about working at PMZ?

                  Working at PMZ gives me the opportunity to share my passion for music and the creative arts and to try to give others the opportunity to take part and enjoy musical experiences too. Plymouth Music Zone is open to everybody and the people who participate in the groups, workshops and behind the scenes all make it such a special ‘zone’ to be in.  Just think what a happy place Plymouth could be if everybody could have a little PMZ magic!

                  What’s the first record/CD you ever bought?

                  I have never bought a record as there wasn’t spare money in the household when I was growing up so relied on the radio and family musical sessions.  I do own some CDs now but I usually pick them up at the charity shop or buy them from a performing band.

                      Seth Lakeman

                      PMZ Patron

                      Seth is a renowned folk singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist, who grew up just north of Plymouth, in Buckland Monachorum in West Devon. He is best known for his performances on fiddle and tenor guitar, but also plays the viola and banjo. We are delighted to have Seth as Plymouth Music Zone’s patron.

                      “I was completely blown away by the size of the operation at PMZ and the kind of opportunities they provide with their amazing work building the confidence and aspirations of their participants. They change lives everyday and I’m delighted to be Plymouth Music Zone’s first ever patron offering help whenever I can.” Seth Lakeman

                       

                          Deborah Myers

                          PMZ Special Adviser

                          Development Director and Consultant.
                          Current Director of Development of the Science Museum Group, the world’s leading group of science museums including five museums across the country. Trustee at Shakespeare’s Globe. 

                          MUSICAL NOTES

                          What do you do for PMZ?
                          I’m a PMZ Special Adviser with a specialism in fundraising for the arts.

                          Do you play any instruments?
                          I play piano and used to play flute, and I sing.

                          What musical instrument would best describe you as a person?
                          I’d like to think a cello – with its combination of warmth, emotion and boldness.

                          What has music done for you in your life?
                          I feel like music has touched every part of my life. My Dad inspired a love of jazz through his piano improvisation and my Mum and Dad took me to classical concerts. In my teens I loved the summer music camps run by Avril Dankworth (Johnny’s sister) that I attended which ignited my love of singing. My husband encouraged a love of opera which I pursued when I worked at the Royal Opera House and my children expand my horizons across rap, hip hop, musical theatre and more.

                          What’s the best bit about working at PMZ?
                          I love the way that music is for everybody at PMZ, young or old and of all abilities and from every section of the community. And I love working with PMZ’s chief executive, the inspiring Debbie Geraghty.

                          What’s the first record/CD you ever bought?
                          Every Breath You Take, by The Police

                            Rob Tilsey

                            Rob Tilsley

                            MUSICAL NOTES

                            What do you do for PMZ?
                            I am the Music Leader for Baton Beats, which is a percussion workshop for adults of all abilities hosted at PMZ on Monday evenings.

                            Do you play any instruments?
                            My main instrument are hand drums.

                            What musical instrument would best describe you as a person?W
                            Crystal Baschet, it’s one of a kind, it’s weird and it does things in its own unique and somewhat awkward way.

                            What has music done for you in your life?
                            Music was the first thing I showed any innate ability with and through that I learned I could succeed at things. 

                            What’s the best bit about working at PMZ?
                            It’s a place like no other. Any given day can contain happenings that have certainly never happened before, and will definitely never happen again. 

                            What’s the first record/CD you ever bought?
                            ‘Obsolete’ by Fear Factory. Cheesy metal that I unashamedly love to this day.

                              Dave England

                              Dave England

                              MUSICAL NOTES

                              What do you do for PMZ?
                              I coordinate PMZ’s events throughout the year, including our Summer Singalong in Devonport Park and Tea, Tinsel & Tonsils, as well as supporting people in the community to raise funds for the wonderful work PMZ gets to do. I’m also a Music Leader with the lovely Sensory Sounds group.

                              Do you play any instruments?
                              My main instrument is the piano, which I’ve played since I was 10.  Since working at PMZ I have mastered three chords on the guitar (!)  and although I wasn’t born to sing, I give it ago – albeit for the encouragement of others!

                              What musical instrument would best describe you and why?
                              As a lover of 80’s music (my childhood!) I’d have to say a good old synthesizer! Axel F anyone??

                              What has music done for you in your life?
                              Music has supported me through every possible emotion from the saddest to the happiest times. It has helped to build my confidence and to express myself.

                              What’s the best bit about working at PMZ?
                              Seeing the genuine difference PMZ’s work makes to people’s lives. I’m so proud to be a part of the team.

                              What’s the first record/CD you ever bought?
                              I remember buying the first Now That’s What I Call Music album on cassette or possibly a Bucks Fizz record!

                                Chris Moore

                                Chris volunteers every week for Plymouth Music Zone, at the Monday night Baton Beats workshop. You’ll also find him helping out at most PMZ events, including Tea, Tinsel and Tonsils and the Summer Singalong.